Did you know the Earth absorbs almost 50 percent of all solar energy and maintains a nearly constant temperature between 50 and 70 degrees? A geothermal HVAC system can utilize this constant temperature to exchange energy between the Earth and your home to provide cooling and heating. This renewable resource of energy can help you and the environment. Read on to learn about the four types of geothermal HVAC systems used in Bluffton, South Carolina.

Horizontal Loops

A comfort specialist will usually install a geothermal HVAC system with a horizontal loop in an area where the condition of the soil allows for extensive excavation. Geothermal HVAC systems with horizontal loops require more land area than any of the others on the list. Therefore, you should only opt for this type of system if you have a large property.

Vertical Loops

If you don’t have a big property, you’ll likely choose to install a geothermal HVAC system with a vertical loop. These only require trenches about 5 feet deep. A comfort specialist will insert a pair of pipes that contain a special U-Bend assembly at the bottom into a bole hole that averages between 150 and 250 feet in depth per ton of equipment.

Open Loops

Geothermal HVAC systems with open loops use water from an underground or a surface source. That source can include a well, a lake or a pond. The geothermal HVAC system will pump water into the heat pump unit where it’ll extract the heat. It’ll then discharge the water back into the source and transfer the extracted heat into your home.

Lake Loops

Lake loops are often very economical to install. If there’s a pond or a lake that’s at least 8 feet deep around your property, you can install this type of geothermal HVAC system. Rather than soil, lake loops utilize water for heat transfer. The best part is that this type of loop is one of the cheapest geothermal HVAC systems to install.

Are you contemplating a geothermal HVAC installation? Contact Howell-Chase Heating & Air Conditioning at 843-305-7965 to learn which type of loop will work best for your property.

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